memory

Research has shown for a while that brain training doesn't improve ADHD symptoms around short-term memory problems for adults with ADHD.  New research released this week suggests it doesn't help the general population of adults, either.  Now what?

You don't have to have stuff everywhere just because one or more of you has ADHD!

ADHD adults often carry a lot of hurt and shame with them.  Learn what these shame triggers are and you can significantly improve your interactions.  A recent conversation with five adults with ADHD and their partners highlights some of the issues.

Is lying a part of your relationship?  Are you eager to move past the lies to a more trusting partnership?  This is the first of several posts that will deal with lies and rebuilding trust in relationships impacted by ADHD.

ADHD, like so many things that people go through, exists on a continuum from more intense to less intense, and in addition, there are different types.  There are those who are Inattentive (and may appear to be spacey), and those who are hyperactive/ impulsive, and those who are both at the same time.  No two individuals with ADHD show up the same way.

Do you fight over whether or not you agreed to something in the past?  Or perhaps you're a non-ADHD partner frustrated that your ADHD partner doesn't seem to remember your conversations?  If so, I would like to suggest a simple solution that will help you avoid these fights.

Want to learn more about ADHD - ADDitude Magazine has an excellent free series of webinars with experts.  This month's adult ADHD topics include: staying on task; managing adult ADHD; improving your memory and information on alternative therapies.  ALL are hot topics.  In addition, you can listen to past webinar recordings, as well.  Go to this link at ADDitude Magazine.

There's a really interesting conversation going on in response to my last blog post that has morphed into whether or not a non-ADHD spouse should secretly record conversations to demonstrate to an ADHD spouse that they really are mishearing and mis-remembering things.  An ADHD spouse has also suggested that recordings might be a good learning tool for "where things go wrong."  Here's what I think:

Do you, like many other couples, find yourselves arguing over whether or not something happened a certain way in the past?  Whether or not you’ve discussed a specific subject?  Wondering whether your partner was actually THERE when you were talking about something with him or her?  If so, you’ve probably experienced the “he said/she said” argument – the one that goes like this:

If you're frustrated with how you and your spouse interact on a daily basis, use these five tips to make immediate improvements. 

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