sleep

Closed childcare and schools are putting huge stress on parents.  Exhausted couples are pushed to their very limits.  9 tips for how to manage better during difficult times.

Your styles have always been different, but now that matters a lot more.  Advice for couples struggling with suddenly finding themselves together 24/7, including ideas for making all that time together easier…even happy.

Researchers have a lot to say about what helps us sleep better.  Here's an easy overview of what the science says you should definitely do, and what you should consider doing to get more sleep at night.

I rarely endorse products - but like most people with ADHD, my husband snores...loudly.  These ear buds have changed my life.

People with ADHD commonly have significant sleep issues, and couples impacted by ADHD often have radically different sleep schedules, with the ADHD partners being night owls and sometimes sporadic sleepers, and exhausted non-ADHD partners often falling into bed at a very early hour.  Here’s how ADHD-impacted couples can do much better in this area.

ADHD may have undermined your last relationship, but it doesn’t have to destroy your future.  Here are 10 tips to keep your future healthier and happier:

Looking to have a happier year in 2015?  Why not pick one of these eight resolutions that can help couples impacted by ADHD turn their lives in a happier, healthier direction this year?

I posted recently about bed times and got several questions about how to get bedtimes aligned better.  I work with couples on this issue with great regularity - those with ADHD often go to bed late, while exhausted non-ADHD partners often go to bed early.  Couples miss out on good time to connect when they hit the bedroom at different times.  Here are some ideas to help:

Many non-ADHD partners want to connect at night with a meaningful "goodnight, honey," a kiss and hug or with some sexual intimacy.  Yet disappointment follows when their partner is too distracted or too tired to shine the spotlight of their attention in the non-ADHD partner's direction.  (Conversely, I sometimes hear complaints from ADHD partners who say that the demands of their non-ADHD partner to come to bed at a certain time are obnoxious...but that's for a different post.)  What to do?

Being without insurance doesn't have to mean you can't make progress against ADHD.  Here are some specific ideas to keep the cost of treatment as low as possible:

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